Dr. Leslie Nwoke

Dr. Leslie Nwoke is passionate about helping leaders become self-aware, resilient, and emotionally intelligent. She believes that if we’re willing to face our difficult emotions on the inside, we are one step closer to achieving amazing things on the outside.

Topics

▪Authenticity ▪Character Development ▪Diversity & Inclusion
▪Emotional Intelligence ▪First Year Experience
▪Leadership ▪Relationships ▪Resilience

Keynotes

▪Want to Change the World? Pay Attention to Your Feelings
▪The Best Friend BreakUp: Finding Closure Beyond the Pain
▪How To Face What (or Who) Scares You: A Conversation on Bias
▪Can We Talk? Navigating Difficult Conversation (…When You Don’t Like Conflict)

 

Dr. Leslie Nwoke is passionate about helping leaders become self-aware, resilient, and emotionally intelligent. She believes that if we’re willing to face our difficult emotions on the inside, we are one step closer to achieving amazing things on the outside.

Dr. Leslie’s focus when speaking with students and their campus communities is the importance of emotional intelligence and how to harness its power and use it effectively in everyday life.

Leslie’s Bio

Dr. Leslie Nwoke is a physician and executive coach. She is also the founder and CEO of HeartWork Now, the online learning and personal development platform. She believes embracing our emotions is the path to living in our purpose. Dr. Leslie has a diverse background in medicine, global health, and nonprofit leadership. As a physician, she’s cared for patients with psychiatric disorders, providing medical management and therapeutic interventions. She co-founded The Ruby Project, a nonprofit offering mentorship for girls who have experienced trauma, and Making Noise, Inc., an advocacy organization for African sex trafficking survivors.

She has provided health education and trauma rehabilitation programming for trafficking survivors in Ethiopia and Italy. In 2017, she was selected as a StartingBloc Social Innovations Fellow, joining a premier group of innovators and leaders. She was crowned as Miss Nigeria in 2004, and later, given the Woman of Excellence Award by the same organization in 2009. Other than her passion for topics on emotion and social justice, she also loves her husband, children, tiramisu, and every album by Celine Dion.

Leslie’s Blogs

The following are past entries Leslie has written for the CAMPUSPEAK Speaker’s Voice Blog

Authenticity

Promotional Materials

To help you promote your event with Leslie, CAMPUSPEAK has created promotional templates you can use. In this folder, you will find resources for social media, a promotional poster for printing, and press photos you can use for your event.
Link to Promotional Materials

Logistical Materials

In-Person Event AV Needs (PDF)
Speaking Introduction (PDF)

Leslie’s vibrant personality can fill a room. She is engaging, eloquent, and has just enough sass to keep a room of powerful people paying attention.

Cherae Robinson

Tastemakers Africa

Dr. Nwoke’s words were moving and deeply empowering. She speaks from a place of authenticity, compassion, and truth.

Annika Erickson-Pearson

Starting Bloc

See What People Have to Say!

Dr. Nwoke did an unbelievable job making an online keynote feel like an interactive, meaningful experience. Her keynote was engaging and she did an amazing job connecting with students 1:1, even noting things like where they’re from and calling back to their hometown later on. The content of her keynote itself was exactly what we we’re looking for. She made a conversation that can sometimes be hard and uncomfortable, especially in front of hundreds of other people on Zoom, feel approachable and empowering. 10/10 would recommend!

Sara Diem – Carnegie Mellon University

I am impressed with Dr. Nwoke’s creativity and drive to “make noise” about issues everyone needs to be concerned about.

Alezandra Russell – Urban Light

Keynotes

You Want to Change the World? Pay Attention to Your Feelings

Today’s students are more influential than ever before. From YouTube stars to millennial entrepreneurs, this generation is changing the norms of leadership. The most effective of them realize, that leading well, means engaging not just your head, but your heart. Emotional intelligence is the process of becoming self-aware by engaging our challenging and messiest emotions and choosing to face them bravely.
In this session, Dr. Leslie will share ways to be a more conscious and emotionally intelligent leader, and leave listeners with three big ideas on how to face the difficult parts of themselves head on.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of attending this program, students will learn:

  • how to define the emotionally intelligent leader and influencer,
  • how to own vulnerability in a world that doesn’t always accept it, and
  • three big ideas around engaging difficult emotions.
The Best Friend BreakUp: Finding Closure Beyond the Pain

The end of any friendship hurts. Moving out from the dorm you & your roommate shared when things aren’t working out. Having conflict with one of your sorority sisters. But the pain of losing a best girlfriend is unique and can be devastating. The end of friendships w/ other women often leave us hurt, asking “What Did I Do Wrong?”, and nervous about trying again w/ other women. However, there’s so little dialogue on how to process the end of girl friendship and how to move forward. In this session, Dr. Leslie will have honest conversation about losing best friends, healing through radical acceptance, and how to still create powerful relationships beyond the pain. This keynote is effective in addressing conflict and peer relationships within student organizations. This talk is most suitable for women’s audiences. This talk can be adapted for coed audiences, teams, and organizations.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of attending this program, students will learn:

  • about conflict occurrences like ghosting and rejection and the work needed to reverse it
  • how to identify and get honest about the emotional root of conflict in friendship
  • the importance of setting boundaries in order to achieve true connection
How To Face What (or Who) Scares You: A Conversation on Bias

Though connected more than ever, we all still have unconscious biases that affect how we perceive or interact with others. These biases create barriers to developing true connection with others. In this session, Dr. Leslie will have an honest but candid discussion around the unconscious biases and prejudices we hold against others and that the solution lies in boldly owning our stories and moving closer to the things (and people) that scare us. This keynote is great for addressing diversity and inclusion and social justice issues on campus, as well as peer relationships within campus organizations. This talk can also be adapted into a workshop format.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of attending this program, students will learn:

  • about the concept of implicit bias and how it goes beyond racism
  • how to identify our personal biases
  • how to use our personal stories and experiences to foster empathy and bridge the social divides biases create
Can We Talk? Navigating Difficult Conversation (…When You Don’t Like Conflict)

“Can we talk?” We’ve all dreaded hearing (or saying) these words at some point in time. The fear of what the conversation might bring makes us avoid the conversation (and the person) all together. But much purpose and growth can come from hard conversations, if we’re brave enough to have them. This session is perfect for campus leaders looking to improve their communication with their peers and organizations. In this session, Dr. Leslie will explore what makes conversations hard and how to have better ones. This keynote is great for student and faculty leadership events and retreats. Can also be adapted into a workshop format.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of attending this program, students will learn:

  • the root to why people avoid conflict and difficult conversations
  • how to identify the emotional root and assumptions you’re making about the other side’s intentions
  • how to lead a  difficult prejudice conversation through empathy and curiosity